Look out below…

An hour long interview with Author, teacher and writing guru Robert McKee.  Whether you love him or hate him, as a writer  of novel, screen or otherwise, chances are you’ve heard of him, he was the story seminar teacher in the film ADAPTATION based on the novel THE ORCHID THIEF and is known worldwide for his hard-hitting methods of lighting a fire under writers. (if you think you’re a writer and you haven’t heard from him – you owe it to yourself to at the very least check out his book STORY from your local library for free).

I have sat in on his seminar and have an (albeit dusty) first printing of his book on my office shelf, whether you adore his pomposity or hate it you have to admit he does make some good points.  The ones to look out for below are as follows in chronological order of the hour:

1) What kind of writer are you, this is all about whether you should write for screen, book, stage or living room and very well put (by someone who has had most of his story writing success occur in living rooms)

2) Exposition (I’ll add theme to his mantra of having something to say, just don’t be preachy about it – let it sink in like he says without any effort on the audience’s part)

3) He goes on about this (#2) overstatement because that’s what he does, and this is him at his most self-serving didactic soapbox and that’s an understatement!

4) Can you tell a good story if you are not one of the most literate writers?

5) How valuable is it to have un-produced/ un-published work?

6) NOBODY can teach you how to write, they can only ask questions and offer advise.

7) How stories can make you succeed in business.  This one, I really like because I’ve been preaching it for years.  Having started my career in Advertising and Marketing — for once I totally agree with you McKee (you’ll have to watch or at least listen to the end for yourself) and down with PowerPoint – man, I hate that!

Lastly —  Why is it dangerous to tell stories if you don’t have talent?

Big Think Interview With Robert McKee | Robert McKee | Big Think.

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